34 Malmstrom officers removed from launch duty for alleged cheating

2014-01-16T06:00:00Z 2014-08-09T18:02:51Z 34 Malmstrom officers removed from launch duty for alleged cheatingThe Associated Press The Associated Press
January 16, 2014 6:00 am  • 

WASHINGTON – In a stunning setback for a nuclear missile force already beset by missteps and leadership lapses, the Air Force disclosed on Wednesday that 34 officers entrusted with the world’s deadliest weapons have been removed from launch duty for allegedly cheating – or tolerating cheating by others – on routine proficiency tests.

The cheating scandal at Malmstrom Air Force Base in Great Falls is the latest in a series of Air Force nuclear stumbles documented in recent months by the Associated Press, including deliberate violations of safety rules, failures of inspections, breakdowns in training, and evidence that the men and women who operate the missiles from underground command posts are suffering burnout. In October the commander of the nuclear missile force was fired for engaging in embarrassing behavior, including drunkenness, while leading a U.S. delegation to a nuclear exercise in Russia.

A “profoundly disappointed” Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James, the service’s top civilian official, told a hurriedly arranged Pentagon news conference that the alleged cheating at Malmstrom was discovered during a previously announced probe of drug possession by 11 officers at several Air Force bases, including two who also are in the nuclear force and suspected of participating in the cheating ring.

“This is absolutely unacceptable behavior,” James said of the cheating, which Gen. Mark Welsh, the Air Force chief of staff, said could be the biggest such scandal in the history of the missile force.

A spokesman for Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said the Pentagon chief, who just last week visited a nuclear missile base and praised the force for its professionalism, was “deeply troubled” to learn of the cheating allegations. The spokesman, Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby, said Hagel insisted he be kept apprised of the investigation’s progress.

Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo., urged Air Force leaders to take swift and decisive action to ensure the integrity of the nuclear mission.

“There simply is no room in our Air Force, and certainly in our nuclear enterprise, for this type of misconduct,” said Udall, the chairman of the Senate Strategic Forces Subcommittee.

***

James said she will travel to each of the Air Force’s three nuclear missile bases next week on a fact-finding mission to learn more about conditions within the missile launch force and the more senior officers who manage them. She suggested that the cheating was confined to this single case involving 34 officers, although numerous missile officers have told the AP confidentially that some feel compelled to cut corners on their monthly proficiency tests because of intense pressure to score at the highest levels to advance in the force.

“I want all of you to know that, based on everything I know today, I have great confidence in the security and the effectiveness of our ICBM force,” she said. “And, very importantly, I want you to know that this was a failure of some of our airmen. It was not a failure of the nuclear mission.”

James, who has been in the job only four weeks, said the entire ICBM launch officer force of about 600 is being retested this week.

Welsh said he knew of no bigger ICBM cheating scandal or launch officer decertification in the history of the missile force, which began operating in 1959. Last spring the Air Force decertified 17 launch officers at Minot Air Force Base, N.D., for a combination of poor performance and bad attitudes; at the time the Air Force said it was the largest-ever one-time sidelining of launch officers.

Welsh said one launch officer at Malmstrom was found to have sent one or more text messages to 16 other launch officers with answers to their test, and that further questioning at Malmstrom determined that 17 other launch officers “self-admitted to at least being aware of material that had been shared. We don’t yet know how or if each of those officers used that material, but we do know that none of them reported the incident to their leadership.”

There are about 190 ICBM launch officers stationed at Malmstrom.

Welsh said the probe continues. “People at every level will be held accountable if and where appropriate,” the general said.

***

The Air Force’s nuclear mission includes operation of 450 Minuteman 3 intercontinental ballistic missiles. The 341st Missile Wing at Malmstrom, where all 34 suspected cheaters are based, is responsible for 150 of the 450 ICBMs. The 34 are junior officers: second lieutenants, first lieutenants and captains. Of those 34, two also are implicated in the drug probe.

The Air Force operates Minuteman 3 missiles at two others bases: F.E. Warren in Wyoming and Minot in North Dakota.

The Malmstrom unit failed a nuclear safety and security inspection in August but succeeded on a re-do in October. Welsh said the alleged cheating took place in August or September; he said other details could not be released because the matter remains under investigation by the Air Force Office of Special Investigations.

The drug investigation that led to the discovery of alleged cheating was disclosed by the Pentagon last week. It said then that it involved 10 officers at six bases – five in the U.S. and one in England. On Wednesday, the Air Force said the number of suspects has grown to 11. Welsh said he could not comment further on the drug probe.

James said the ICBM force “needs attention” and that while immediate corrective action is being taken, Air Force leaders are planning to address some longer-term initiatives.

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

(6) Comments

  1. raptor53
    Report Abuse
    raptor53 - January 17, 2014 12:14 pm
    these are the people entrusted to launching the most powerful and horrific weapons known to mankind ? Now we find out they have no integrity and they do drugs !
  2. Snowcrest
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    Snowcrest - January 16, 2014 2:55 pm
    This scandal's worse than the Secret Service's hooker-gate. Not much leadership from the top down.
    Meanhwhile, the President and Secretary of state could not be found for comments as they're extremely busy with some damage control over their latest plan to make it appear Iran is limiting it's nukes.
  3. BJackson
    Report Abuse
    BJackson - January 16, 2014 10:32 am
    mdstevens, you are living in a fantasy world if you think we can Just get rid of the ICBM's, in this day and age there will be ballistic capabilities for ever, there are far to many threats to get rid of them and "Spend" money that benefits all of us. Having installations that protect all of us, is actually spending money that benefits all of us. The arms race will continue until the day humans leave the planet, it is just a fact of life.
  4. Salish
    Report Abuse
    Salish - January 16, 2014 9:19 am
    Wow. Showing up for this kind of a job stoned out of your mind, and then cheating on a proficiency test. Unbelievable! These guys belong in a military prison, not anywhere else!
  5. Faxnlogicovremotnlhystria
    Report Abuse
    Faxnlogicovremotnlhystria - January 16, 2014 7:02 am
    Theyre something we have to have. As long as china and Russia have them and korea wants them we must also. They're a deterrent that hopefully will never be used.
  6. mdstevens
    Report Abuse
    mdstevens - January 15, 2014 11:48 pm
    Launch the F. what???? How 'bout we start spending money on ways to benefit all of us. stop this arms race to the demise of life on this planet. ICBM's are as necessary as wet leather.
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