Skip to main content
You have permission to edit this article.
Edit
Essential Hemingway reading
AP

Essential Hemingway reading

  • 0
{{featured_button_text}}
American writer Ernest Hemingway travelling with US soldiers, in his capacity as war correspondent, on their way to Normandy for the D-Day landings in 1944..

American writer Ernest Hemingway (1899 -1961) travelling with US soldiers, in his capacity as war correspondent, on their way to Normandy for the D-Day landings in 1944. (Central Press/Getty Images/TNS)

Ernest Hemingway's terse prose style might seem clichéd today, but his short, declarative sentences and beneath-the-surface meaning were groundbreaking in his time. Here are four novels and a short-story collection that are essential reading.

'The Sun Also Rises' (1926)

His first novel is the love story of Jake Barnes, who suffered a tragic war wound, and the promiscuous Lady Brett Ashley, who has an affair with a much younger man, a matador. It's all set against bullfighting and the running of the bulls in Spain.

'For Whom the Bell Tolls' (1940)

An American, Robert Jordan, goes to help fight the Spanish Civil War and is tasked with blowing up a bridge. He finds love, betrayal, heroism and death.

'A Farewell to Arms' (1929)

American Frederic Henry falls in love with nurse Catherine Barkley while working as an ambulance driver in Italy during World War I. After he is badly injured, they flee to Switzerland, where she dies in childbirth. A brutal, unsentimental novel of pain, love and war.

'The Old Man and the Sea' (1952)

An epic battle between Cuban fisherman Santiago and a giant marlin. The novel won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and contributed to Hemingway's winning the Nobel Prize in literature in 1954.

'Men Without Women' (1927)

This collection includes "Hills Like White Elephants," a quintessential Hemingway story in which a man and a woman share a drink and a cryptic talk — but so much more goes on.

You must be logged in to react.
Click any reaction to login.
0
0
0
0
0

Stay up-to-date on what's happening

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.

Related to this story

Most Popular

At least two powerful figures will be voting Amanda Gorman for president as soon as the 23-year-old inauguration poet is eligible in 2036. In a new Vogue interview with writer Doreen St. Felix, Gorman elaborated on her plan to campaign for the highest office in the United States — and revealed that she has already secured unofficial but key endorsements from former Secretary of State (and ...

"The Wild Silence" by Raynor Winn; Penguin Books (288 pages, $17) ——— Immediately upon finishing Raynor Winn's 2019 memoir, "The Salt Path," I went to the computer and called up Google. "What happened to Moth?" I typed. I needed to know; In the course of reading that powerful book, Winn and her husband, Moth Walker, had become important to me. Winn's gorgeous new memoir, "The Wild Silence," ...

“The Irish Diaspora: Tales of Emigration, Exile and Imperialism” by Turtle Bunbury; Thames & Hudson (304 pages, $34.95) ——— Ireland’s greatest export was always its people. Some fled famine, violence, or poverty. Others sought love, adventure, or fortune. And Turtle Bunbury’s “The Irish Diaspora: Tales of Emigration, Exile and Imperialism” pays them tribute. The word diaspora comes from Greek ...

"Infinite Country" by Patricia Engel; Avid Reader Press/Simon & Schuster (208 pages, $25) ——— "Infinite Country," the new novel by Patricia Engel, has an irresistible first line: “It was her idea to tie up the nun.” The girl who has the idea, 15-year-old Talia, is intent on escaping from a remote reform school in the mountains of Colombia. "Infinite Country" is all about making escapes from ...

Richard Thompson’s combination of skills as a songwriter and guitarist is unmatched. The musician’s career — from his rise with British folk-rock inventors Fairport Convention to his 1970s partnership with his wife Linda Thompson to three decades as a solo artist — stretches over 50 years. But Thompson’s new memoir, which was written with Scott Timberg, zeroes in on only the first eight. It’s ...

As recently as 2010, the award-winning teen novel “Looking for Alaska” topped the American Library Association’s list of books most often challenged by parents and community members, thanks largely to a single sex scene. Just two years ago, eight of the 10 books on the ALA’s most-banned list featured LGBTQ topics. But 2020 was a year like no other, and that was reflected in the books Americans ...

"Death Grip" by Elaine Viets; Severn (208 pages, $28.99) ——— The wealthy St. Louis suburb of Chouteau Forest is known for its beautiful homes and well-kept lawns, but it also is known as a place that guards its secrets. Here, “local robber barons hung onto their money, their grudges, their sins and scandals.” Death investigator Angela Richman knows all too well the evil that lurks beneath the ...

Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, April 3, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2021 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2021, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. "The Red Book" by James Patterson and David Ellis (Little, Brown) Last ...

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alert

Breaking News