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    Critics accuse the British administration of running “government by WhatsApp” due to the popularity of the messaging app with politicians and officials. So it feels inevitable that a tussle over WhatsApp messages is at the heart of Britain’s official inquiry into how the country handled the COVID-19 pandemic. Thousands of messages exchanged between then-Prime Minister Boris Johnson and government ministers, aides and officials form key evidence for the investigation  chaired by retired judge Heather Hallett. The Conservative government is now led by Prime Minister Rishi Sunak. It wants to be able to edit the messages before handing them over. The government says some are personal and irrelevant to the inquiry.

      Customers of Venmo, PayPal and CashApp should not store their money with those apps for the long term because the funds may not be covered by deposit insurance. That's according to a warning from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Thursday. The alert comes several weeks after the failure of Silicon Valley Bank, Signature Bank and First Republic Bank. Those institutions experienced bank runs after fearful customers with uninsured deposits pulled their money en masse. Money stored on a payment app is not being held in a traditional bank account. So, if there is an event similar to a bank run with the payment apps, those funds may not be protected.

        Meta is preparing to block news for some Canadians on Facebook and Instagram in a temporary test that is expected to last through the end of June. The Silicon Valley tech giant is following in the steps of Google, which earlier this year blocked news content from some of its Canadian users in response to a government bill that will require tech giants to pay publishers for linking to or otherwise repurposing their content online. Meta says it’s prepared to block news permanently on Facebook and Instagram if the bill passes, which the government said could happen this month.

          Asian stock markets are following Wall Street higher ahead of an update on the U.S. jobs market. This comes after Federal Reserve officials reignited hopes they might skip another interest rate hike this month. Shanghai, Tokyo, Hong Kong and Seoul advanced Friday. Oil prices strengthened. Wall Street’s benchmark S&P 500 index rallied 1% after data showed manufacturing and retail activity weakening following rate hikes to rein in surging inflation. That added to hopes the Fed might decide to postpone or scale back more planned increases. The U.S. Senate gave final legislative approval to raise the amount the government can borrow and avert a possible debt default.

            This week’s new entertainment releases include an album from Foo Fighters and some lost songs by the late Kenny Rogers, a new gritty HBO series from “Euphoria” creator Sam Levinson called “The Idol” starring Lily-Rose Depp and The Weeknd. LeBron James’s origin story is dramatized in the film “Shooting Stars” and  ESPN’s award-winning “30 for 30” series returns with “The American Gladiators Documentary,” a two-part film examining the history of the former syndicated reality-competition show. There's also a release of Bob Dylan re-recordings of old songs that will have fans

              With memorial day sales behind us, people are already looking forward to the next mega-sales event of the year - Amazon Prime Day, a two-day summer version of Black Friday or Cyber Monday with deals on electronics, home goods, kitchen gear, clothes and pretty much everything else. So when is…

                A bill that would force Big Tech companies to pay news agencies for using their content passed its first big test in the state Legislature on Thursday. Proponents said the measure will provide a lifeline to local news organizations, but opponents said the bill favors out-of-state big newspaper chains and could violate the First Amendment. Meta, the company that owns Facebook, has vowed to remove news stories from Facebook if the bill were to become law. Similar efforts to bolster local journalism have been attempted by the United States Congress, with little success. The California bill received bipartisan support.

                For iced coffee diehards, it doesn’t matter what the weather is like outside, it just tastes too good! But when it comes to making iced coffee yourself, how can you reproduce it the way your barista would? Buzz60 has more.

                Since the pandemic, package theft has become a constant consumer concern. CNBC reports in 2022 an estimated 260 million delivered packages were stolen, according to a report from SafeWise. Veuer’s Maria Mercedes Galuppo has the story.

                A new Florida law banning gender-affirming care for minors is getting a lot of attention nationally as Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis runs for president, but it's also impacting transgender adults. Children were the main focus of debate and coverage of the new law that DeSantis signed last month. However, it also includes restrictions on adult care. That's creating chaos for patients and providers in the state with what's estimated to be the nation's second-highest transgender population. Patients now have to be treated face-to-face by a medical doctor. Those restrictions have proved particularly onerous because many trans adults were seeing nurse practitioners and using telehealth.

                New York's fledgling marijuana market doesn't have enough licensed retailers to sell the 300,000 pounds (136,000 kilograms) of cannabis grown by farmers in the state. Farmers can only legally sell their product in a dozen licensed dispensaries statewide, and they're feeling a financial pinch as another growing season gets underway. Pot businesses in the West have struggled with black market competition and high taxes, but in New York, the farmers’ plight is part of the bumpy launch of New York’s recreational pot market. State leaders had always planned to gear up the market in stages, but dispensaries have debuted at a slower pace than expected.

                Texas has become the most populous state to ban gender-affirming care for minors. Gov. Greg Abbott signed legislation on Friday instituting the prohibition. Texas joins at least 18 other states that have enacted similar bans. Every major medical organization, including the American Medical Association, opposes the bans and supports the medical care for youth when administered appropriately. Lawsuits have been filed in several states where bans have been enacted this year. Last year, Abbott became the first governor to order the investigation of families who were receiving care. The investigations were later halted by a Texas judge.

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