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When Sen. Barack Obama won the Democratic primary in early June, his entire campaign suddenly moved from the almost unbelievable 16-month climb from relative obscurity and no chance of winning the nomination to the almost unbelievable possibility that this man will break all barriers and occupy the White House on January 2009.

Why? How could this happen? Well, one must not only give credit to the man himself, but to a most energized, youthfully enthusiastic and well organized campaign staff, and thousands of eager volunteers all over the country. You think, perhaps, that the older generations have all the answers? You think, perhaps, that experience is the key to winning? You think, perhaps, that the younger generations have other things to think about than politics and they are so caught up in the cell phone/computer/hip-hop culture that there is no time to give to political campaigns? Well, I believe we had better think again.

If you think that with a Sen. McCain victory in November things will change, think again, because no matter what he is saying things will not change. The political will for broad change is simply not there.

Our faltering educational system will remain the same. There will not be new and responsible policies to solve our fiscal mess. The environmental problems will not be addressed with any real vigor. New and effective programs for those citizens in need will not be instituted. Our global reputation as an arrogant nation, bent upon military might, will not be repaired and changed.

This most believable scenario is capturing the attention of people all over this great nation of ours, and we may just be led by youthful wisdom and hope rather than the stodgy plodding along of a political system fraught with greed, fear, anger and divisiveness.

Bob McClellan, Polson

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