Subscribe for 17¢ / day

Why the attacks on the Poverello?

When I was in my early 20s, I was a drifter and lived outside for more than a year and often had trouble finding work. I sometimes relied on the Poverello for meals when I was desperately hungry, and would also volunteer in the kitchen. The food, the work and the people there helped me in ways that mattered the most. Back then, as I think is the case now, the vast majority of the people who relied on the Pov were like me and not criminals or in any way guilty of anything other than poverty and hard luck.

My 20s were a long time ago. I stayed in Missoula, and have prospered. Graduated from the university. Raised a family. Started several successful businesses, which have always paid much higher salaries than most Missoula businesses are able to. Poverty is no crime, and neither is prosperity. At least that is how the laws in our city, state and country are written.

I am grateful that the Pov was there for me, and I know that Missoula is a better place because the Poverello is here now. As individuals and as a community we are at our best when we take care of the weakest amongst us. I for one am the proudest of what do I to help people around me; all other accomplishments, and our very selves, will eventually turn to dust. The unselfish good we do for others is all that really lasts.

Steve Saroff, president of RemoteScan Corp., Missoula

0
0
0
0
0
You must be logged in to react.
Click any reaction to login.