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A federal judge on Wednesday ordered a 54-year-old man charged with intentionally crashing his car into a federal building in Bozeman be treated for mental and physical health issues before his case can proceed.

William David Hutton was ordered in July to undergo a psychiatric evaluation and did so for nearly two months at a federal detention facility in Washington. On Tuesday, U.S. Chief District Judge Dana Christensen in Missoula found Hutton "suffers from a mental disorder or disease" after a forensic psychologist determined he suffered from paranoid delusions, possibly as a result of suffering from Graves' disease, according to court filings. 

In his order filed Wednesday, Christensen filed an order that Hutton be hospitalized for no more than four months "to determine whether there is substantial probability that in the foreseeable future he will attain the capacity" to sufficiently consult with his defense counsel and stand trial. The order also states Hutton will receive medical treatment for the Graves' Disease and mental health counseling.

The U.S. Bureau of Prisons will determine where Hutton will be committed, although he has requested placement at a facility in Butner, North Carolina, according to Christensen's order.

Hutton was charged in July on one count of destruction of government property, which carries a maximum 10-year prison sentence. He has pleaded not guilty to the charge.

Authorities allege in court documents that Hutton drove slowly and deliberately into the front door of the federal building on East Babcock Street in Bozeman on July 8. A security officer inside the entrance ordered Hutton out of the vehicle at gunpoint, and he was transported to the hospital for evaluation, according to court filings. 

At the scene, investigators saw a handgun behind the front passenger seat and several rounds of ammunition in the opened glove box, court records state. 

Investigators interviewed Hutton at a coffee shop on July 10, during which Hutton aired grievances with the federal government stemming from a misdemeanor conviction for sexual abuse in 2003 while he was employed at Yellowstone National Park, according to the federal charging documents. The conviction led to unemployment, as well as a series of medical problems that continued to the present day, according to investigators. 

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"Hutton stated that his plan on July 8 was to make entry to the building by using his vehicle," FBI Agent Matthew Deurmeier wrote in charging documents. "Upon entry, Hutton stated he intended to make his way to the maintenance room where he planned to disconnect the gas lines to the building, fill the building with gas, and then ignite it using a lighter. Hutton believed his actions would 'level the building.'"

The damage to the building's entryway has been estimated between $14,000 and $18,000, according to court documents. 

Christensen issued his finding in court on Tuesday following testimony by Dr. Cynthia Low, a forensic psychologist who appeared by video from SeaTac, Washington. Low evaluated Hutton there from Aug. 9 through Sept. 23. According to a previous filing by Christensen, Low found that Hutton demonstrated "an average ability" to understand the nature and consequences of the case against him, but a poor ability to properly assist his attorney in his defense.

Christensen's order on Wednesday mandates status reports be disclosed to prosecutors and Hutton's defense counsel every 30 days.

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