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Jack Jarvey

Jack Jarvey

A 65-year-old Missoula man was given four 100-year sentences Thursday for molesting a young girl and forcing her into sex acts with two boys. 

A Missoula County District Court jury convicted Jack Eldon Jarvey in January of sexual intercourse without consent, three counts of sexual abuse of children and one count of intimidation. 

"This sentence may well exceed your lifetime," Missoula Judge John Larson told Jarvey at the hearing on Thursday, "and I must say what you've done … will persist with them for their entire lives as well."

At trial, the victims who testified said their ages ranged from third grade to fifth grade when the abuse began several years ago. The abuse went on every weekend for two years, until a girl told her mother Jarvey was forcing her to perform sex acts on boys at the home. 

Jarvey's attorney did not make arguments at Thursday's sentencing, opting to take the case to the state Supreme Court on appeal.

"Mr. Jarvey maintains that he's an innocent man," public defender Reed Mandelko told Larson. "He's confident in his chances on appeal."

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Along with the four lengthy sentences on the rape and abuse charges, Larson handed down a 10-year sentence for the intimidation charge, the maximum penalty for such an offense. Each sentence will run concurrently, an arrangement offered by Deputy County Attorney Ryan Mickelson in light of Jarvey's age. 

The psychosexual evaluation of Jarvey completed by sentencing reportedly showed "little or no empathy for the victims" and "projected blame onto the victims," Mickelson said. Jarvey will have to complete multiple phases of sex offender treatment before he is eligible for parole.

Larson also addressed the victims in the courtroom during his final statements to Jarvey.

"This sentence is intended not only to punish you but to express the remorse of the state and the value the state places on the victims," he said, then turned to the victims. "You should feel valuable, you should feel full, you should feel complete in living the rest of your lives, knowing the rest of his life will be in the Montana state prison."

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