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KALISPELL – Turns out Lone Coyote Lake, the name a Kalispell couple has proposed for a small lake near their home, may not be a shoo-in.

Two people have come forward to say they believe the 10-acre lake already has a name, even if none has appeared on U.S. Geological Survey maps for some six decades.

One says it’s Mohn Lake.

The other says no, it’s Moon Lake.

The responses came after Gerry Daumiller, Montana’s geographic names adviser, sought public comment on a proposal by John and Sharon Ramsey to give the lake, a portion of which sits on their property, a name.

Their suggestion, Lone Coyote Lake, would match the name of the road they live on, Lone Coyote Trail. Neither the Ramseys, nor Daumiller, could find evidence that the lake already had a name.

The Ramseys were interested in stocking what they had always called “the pond” with fish, but said they had been told by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks that couldn’t happen if the body of water didn’t have a name.

The Missoulian published a story about the suggestion, and the process for naming or re-naming geographic features in Montana, on Oct. 23.

Since then, Daumiller has heard from two other area residents who say they think the lake already has a name.

One believes it was named for Mathis Mohn, who owned land around the lake from 1898 to 1937, and donated the property south of the lake in 1911 where the Stillwater Free Lutheran Church is located.

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The other person pointed out that another road that juts off Lone Coyote Trail near the lake is named Moon Lake Trail. They believe that road was named after the lake, as opposed to the current proposal to name the lake after another road.

So Daumiller, a geographer with the Montana State Library, is seeking more input. Anyone with knowledge of the Moon Lake or Mohn Lake names, or with knowledge of documents showing either name, is asked to contact him at 406-444-5358, at gdaumiller@mt.gov, or at P.O. Box 201800, Helena, MT 59620.

It is Daumiller’s job to give the state’s official recommendation on such name proposals to the U.S. Board on Geographic Names, which has the final say.

And, on another matter, FWP has clarified its requirements for stocking an unnamed lake.

Jannice Richardson, an administrative supervisor with the agency, says a one-time stocking permit is available. FWP would then assign a name to the lake, just so it can track the results in its system.

Richardson says the Ramseys were informed of this in August, but that was after they had begun the process to propose “Lone Coyote” as the name for the lake.

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