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The Latest: Yellowstone River fish kill reaches park

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The Latest: Yellowstone River fish kill reaches park

In this Sept. 9, 2004 file photo, two fly fishermen and an oarsman test their angling skills as they float down the Yellowstone River near Pine Creek, Mont., fishing access. Montana is closing a 175-mile stretch of the Yellowstone River to all recreational activities to prevent the spread of a parasite that is believed to have killed tens of thousands of fish, authorities said Friday., Aug. 19, 2016. (Garrett Cheen/The Livingston Enterprise via AP, File)

BILLINGS (AP) — The Latest on a massive fish kill on the Yellowstone River that prompted the closure of a 183-mile stretch of the river (all times local):

12:28 p.m.

Montana wildlife officials say a massive fish kill that prompted the closure of a 183-mile stretch of river includes dead fish found inside Yellowstone National Park.

The announcement came as the park prepares to hold a large celebration next week marking the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service.

The Yellowstone River and all of its tributaries were closed Friday to fishing, boating and other activities between the towns of Gardiner and Laurel.

Officials are seeking to limit the spread of a parasite believed to have killed tens of thousands of whitefish and a smaller number of trout.

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The closure order did not include the park. But Yellowstone spokeswoman Charissa Reid says park scientists were looking at the issue and more information would be released later in the day.

___

10 a.m.

Montana is closing a 175-mile stretch of the Yellowstone River to all recreational activities to prevent the spread of a parasite that is believed to have killed tens of thousands of fish.

Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials said Friday the closure extends from Yellowstone National Park's northern boundary at Gardiner to Laurel, along with tributaries in those areas.

The agency says the action is needed to prevent the spread of the parasite and to protect the fishery and the outdoor economy it sustains.

Over the past week, wildlife officials have documented over 2,000 dead mountain whitefish and believe the total number killed is tens of thousands of fish.

FWP has set up two aquatic invasive species decontamination stations in an effort to reduce the chance of spreading the parasite.

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