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To continue strengthening youth and building community, the Missoula Family YMCA plans to boost membership 50 percent by 2011, according to chief executive officer David Ports.

"It is a big goal," Ports said.

In a presentation Monday to the Missoula City Council, Ports reviewed the organization's history and plans for the future. The YMCA also aims to increase participation in its youth programs 50 percent by the same date.

A conversation is under way about how to reach those goals, but Ports said people from as far away as Hamilton and Kalispell call and express interest in the YMCA. That could mean another branch later on. A capital development process also could emerge, he said.

At the meeting, Ports shared some of the varied contributions the Christian organization has made in the country. He credited the YMCA with creating the game of basketball and even with starting Father's Day as it exists today.

Here, the YMCA counts some 6,500 as members, including those who don't have deep pockets.

"No one is turned away at the YMCA due to inability to pay," he said.

Ward 4 Councilman Jon Wilkins said he could attest to that because many youth he worked with couldn't pay, but the YMCA didn't shut them out.

"I'm proud to have you in Missoula and I'm proud to have you in Ward 4," Wilkins said.

At the meeting, council members unanimously approved a $20,000 Community Development Block Grant for the Salvation Army to fund emergency shelter for homeless families through the Gateway Center Family Shelter.

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Before sending the matter back to committee, council members also discussed a 16-lot subdivision north of River Road.

According to Todd Klietz, floodplain administrator at the Office of Planning and Grants, the Cobban and Dinsmore's Orchard Homes subdivision currently sits in the floodplain, though its designation could change later.

But Klietz said a development there opens the door for residents to sue the city if they get flooded out, as happened to the county with a Grant Creek subdivision.

A lawsuit filed after the Mullan Trail subdivision flooded cost the county some $300,000, he said. According to Missoulian archives, the fix cost some $3 million in Federal Emergency Management Agency money.

In other business, Ryan Morton, with the Missoula Building Industry Association, asked that the MBIA be able to review and comment on proposals under consideration, such as one on inclusionary zoning.

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