Skip to main content
Updating results

Diagnosis And Treatment

  • Updated

When cancer patients stop smoking, they heal faster, experience fewer side effects from treatment and lower their chances of tumors returning. Now, top cancer hospitals are helping patients quit as evidence mounts that it’s never too late.

  • Updated

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. (AP) — Crumbling roofs and parking lots. Broadband glitches. Technology challenges. The priority list for Prestera Center goes beyond the mental health and addiction treatment services it provides to patients throughout West Virginia.

  • Updated

ROME (AP) — The Vatican on Wednesday announced a grueling itinerary for Pope Francis’ first post-surgery foreign trip, scheduling around-the-clock encounters and hopscotching flights for his Sept. 12-15 visit to Hungary and Slovakia.

  • Updated

As the coronavirus pandemic threatened to overwhelm Chinese hospitals last year, Chinese resellers appear to have colluded to inflate the prices of ventilators and other essential medical equipment from multinational companies including Siemens, GE and Philips, according to a review of recent public records on the sale of medical equipment in China.

  • Updated

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A bill that would require doctors to tell women undergoing drug-induced abortions about a disputed method for potentially stopping the abortion process was introduced Thursday in the Ohio House.

  • Updated

After using drugs on and off for years, Megan Sims wanted to get clean again. But she couldn’t bring herself to stop during the coronavirus pandemic, even when she discovered she was going to have a baby. She had been to rehab before but couldn’t fathom how to do it while pregnant.

  • Updated

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Twenty states are supporting South Carolina's defense of a new abortion law, arguing in an amicus brief that a federal judge was wrong to pause the entire measure instead of just the provision facing a court challenge.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare on Monday launched a formal process to decide whether to cover Aduhelm, the new Alzheimer's drug whose $56,000-a-year price tag and unproven benefits have prompted widespread criticism and a congressional investigation.

  • Updated

CINCINNATI (AP) — The Kentucky Department of Corrections can deny a life-saving but expensive hepatitis C medication to inmates, a federal appeals court ruled in a split decision. The dissenting judge in last week's 2-1 ruling at the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said the majority's opinion will condemn hundreds of prisoners to long-term organ damage and suffering, The Courier-Journal reported.

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alert

Breaking News