Skip to main content
Updating results

Ginger

  • Updated

A hard cocktail of rain, wind and snowflakes assaulted the farmers market last week. It was the kind of prolonged spring squall that has to make a farmer — more of whom showed up than shoppers — question his or her career choices. The only thing that sold out was coffee, because everyone’s hands were cold. A vat of steaming congee, on special at the Vietnamese sandwich stall, would have sold out too, but they ran out of bowls.

A cooked combo of red onion, garlic, ginger, chives, scallions, and mustard, baked atop the fish, will make you want to get it into your mouth as soon as you smell the irresistible aroma emerging from the oven.

  • Updated

Ginger may help reduce pain and improve mobility in people with arthritis. A study in patients with rheumatoid arthritis noted that daily ginger powder for 12 weeks improved inflammation (Gene, 2019). Several studies have shown ginger can improve gastrointestinal symptoms, such as nausea and vomiting. One study found that daily ginger supplementation improved these symptoms in patients with advanced cancer (Supportive Care in Cancer, 2019).

  • Updated

There are many forms of ginger: dried, pickled, preserved, crystallized, candied, powdered, ground and fresh, which packs the most flavor. Refrigerate unpeeled, fresh ginger a few weeks, or freeze up to six months. Keep dried and ground ginger tightly sealed in a cool, dry place. Slice, chop or grate ginger into veggie side dishes, stir fries, soups and roasted or mashed winter squash or sweet potatoes. Mix with soy sauce, olive oil and garlic and use as a salad dressing or marinade. Definitely add it to baked goods for warming, sweet-smelling bliss.

  • Updated

Ginger (Zingiber officinale), a member of the same plant family as cardamom and turmeric, is the rhizome (underground rootstalk) of the ginger plant. Peek beneath the (usually) rough exterior — knobby, basic beige and a bit craggy — to reveal a flesh that may be yellow, white or reddish, depending on the variety.

  • Updated

When Americans get excited about squash, it isn't usually for the stems. We eat the fruits — thin-skinned zucchini or hardened winter squashes — and sometimes we eat the squash blossoms. But the rest of the plant is edible, too, including the broad fuzzy leaves, prickly stems and curlicue climbing tendrils. Indeed, many cultures around the world prize these itchy, scratchy plant parts.

  • Updated

The "I'm about to puke" feeling is one of the worst feelings, right? Here are five tips for how to feel better when your stomach is in the pits.

  • Updated

ST. REGIS – Floyd Eugene Brady, 82, passed away Tuesday, June 6, 2017, at his home near St. Regis. He was born Feb.13, 1935, to Clyde and Kati…

  • Updated

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

News Alert

Breaking News