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FRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Is your pooch a herder or a hunter? You can try taking them to a trainer, but new research shows much of their behavior is hardwired in their DNA.

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A new breast cancer study finds many women with two or three breast tumors can get by with lumpectomy surgery instead of having their whole breast removed. The research is being discussed Friday at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Experts say it's an important finding because more sensitive imaging techniques are revealing tiny, once-hidden cancers. That means more patients are being diagnosed with multiple cancer sites in the same breast. The researchers followed nearly 200 women with two or three tumors in one breast who had lumpectomies followed by radiation. Just 3% saw cancer come back after five years.

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Portugal’s parliament has voted for the third time in almost two years in favor of allowing euthanasia. But as happened in the previous attempts the country’s Constitutional Court or president could stop Friday's bill becoming law. Lawmakers approved a bill permitting euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. Left-of-center parties in the mostly Catholic country were the driving force behind the bill, as they were with laws allowing abortion in 2007 and same-sex marriage in 2010. The bill requires the head of state’s approval to become law. He could also send it once more to the Constitutional Court for vetting. That could hold up a final decision for several months.

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Social media users are reporting a rash of COVID-19 cases in schools and businesses across China after the ruling Communist Party loosened anti-virus rules as it tries to reverse a deepening economic slump. While official data showed a fall in new cases, they no longer cover large parts of the population after this week’s decision to end mandatory testing for many people. That was part of dramatic changes aimed at gradually emerging from “zero COVID” restrictions that sparked protests and demands for President Xi Jinping to resign. Social media users in Beijing and other cities said coworkers or classmates were ill and some businesses had closed due to a lack of staff.

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THURSDAY, Dec. 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Among men aged 18 to 49 years who are eligible for the JYNNEOS vaccine, mpox incidence is considerably higher among unvaccinated persons versus those who received one or two vaccine doses, according to research published in the Dec. 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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THURSDAY, Dec. 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- About 10 percent of deaths among ever-employed persons aged 15 years and older were associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in 2020, according to research published in the Dec. 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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THURSDAY, Dec. 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The JYNNEOS vaccine, which is recommended for persons exposed to or at high risk for exposure to mpox virus, seems safe, with the most common adverse health events reported as nonserious, according to research published in the Dec. 9 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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An Indiana doctor has dropped a lawsuit that aimed to halt the state’s attorney general from investigating her after she provided an abortion to a 10-year-old Ohio child who was raped. Thursday court filings say lawyers for Dr. Caitlin Bernard of Indianapolis voluntarily nixed the lawsuit filed last month against Indiana Republican Attorney General Todd Rokita. The lawsuit argued Rokita’s office was wrongly justifying the investigation with “frivolous” consumer complaints submitted by people with no personal knowledge about the girl’s treatment. Marion County Judge Heather Welch ruled that Rokita could continue investigating Bernard but also said Rokita wrongly made public comments about investigating Bernard before he filed a complaint about her with the medical board.

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A Washington school district will pay $5.25 million to the family of a high school student who died from a heart attack that happened during a 2018 football practice. The Seattle Times reports 16-year-old Allen Harris was participating in a conditioning practice on an “exceptionally hot” July 24 when he collapsed and suffered a seizure after completing sets of sprints. The lawsuit says three coaches failed to recognize the sudden cardiac arrest symptoms and didn’t resuscitate him. Federal Way school district spokesperson Whitney Chiang said in a statement that the teen's death “was felt across Federal Way Public Schools, and those who knew him continue to feel this loss.”

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Memphis has long suffered from disproportionately high homicide rates. And like many other cities, it endured a surge in homicides in 2020 on the heels of the pandemic. The violence seized the attention of Patrick Lawler, who runs the nonprofit Youth Villages. Lawler discovered a body of research suggesting that a surprisingly small number of people, generally acting in groups, are typically behind most gun violence. Building on that research, he established a community intervention program that aims to reduce gun violence in Memphis and has set an ambitious goal of raising $60 million to sustain it.

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Authorities say a northern Iowa couple drowned their newborn in a bathtub shortly after she was born, fearing her cries would draw the attention of police. Brandon Thoma and Taylor Blaha of Fort Dodge were ordered held Thursday on first degree murder charges, even though the baby's remains have not been found. Arrest affidavits say the mother showed up in a hospital saying she had given birth in their apartment bathroom after the father gave her methamphetamine to ease the pain. Both said they feared police would take custody of their 2-year-old if drugs were found in her system. She's waiting for a lawyer; his attorney says he'll plead not guilty.

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The manager appointed by the U.S. Department of Justice to help fix the long-troubled water system in Mississippi’s capital has an expansive list of reforms on his plate. Ted Henifin intends to make substantial progress on all of them over a one-year period. Henifin has been selected to carry out reforms to Jackson's water system after it partially collapsed in late August. He arrives in Jackson after spending 15 years managing a sanitation district in Virginia. Henifin says he will prioritize making technological improvements to Jackson's water system without forcing the city’s poorest residents to pay higher water bills.

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